We are accepting primary care patients for ROUTINE CARE. Book An Appointment if your child is sick.

Kidcrew Medical - Lactation

Lactation and Breast Feeding Resources

The Lactation Crew at Kidcrew will support you and your vision of feeding success.

Kidcrew Medical - Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy Resources

Babies begin their gross motor development by learning to lift their heads on their tummy.

Kidcrew Medical - Occupational Therapy

Occupational Therapy Resources

Occupational therapy promotes independence in everyday life.

Kidcrew Medical - Therapy

Therapy Resources

Our therapy team is dedicated to helping your family with improving your child’s mental health.

VIEW ALL OUR RESOURCES

Weaning Off Breast Feeding – Six Months and Beyond

As a Lactation Consultant who works in a clinic and community setting, I see babies of all different ages and answer questions from mothers about nursing well beyond the first and second years. Breastfeeding an older baby is fun as they are full of personality and unique quirks, but it comes with questions very different from the newborn stage!

Here are three of the top questions that I get asked:

1. Do I need to pump when I go back to work?

Should you be returning to work before the year mark? The answer is yes.

You will need to pump expressed milk each time that baby feeds while you are away from them. This will help maintain your milk supply. However, the luxury that many Canadian mothers have of staying home for a year (and now 18 months for some mamas!) means that upon a return to the workforce, there is no need to pump.

Baby will likely want to breastfeed as soon as they see you and throughout their time with you, but while you are away, your breasts will figure out that they are no longer needed. In the first few weeks of returning to work, if the mother feels discomfort, hand expressing a little milk will help relieve the breasts until they get used to the time away from the baby.

2. If I am still breastfeeding, will my baby need cow’s milk?

This is one of the best aspects of breastfeeding beyond the year mark. If your baby is breastfeeding at least three times a day, there is no need to worry about them receiving any other kind of milk. After four months, many babies are taking solid food, too.

Between your pumped milk and a well-balanced diet or solid foods, they will receive more than enough of the necessary vitamins and minerals. Breastfeeding mothers do not need to worry about intake from breast milk alone, even if they have done partial weaning. Cow’s milk can be offered in addition to expressed milk or instead of breast milk. Once you stop breastfeeding, alternative milk or whole cow’s milk can be introduced.

3. My baby won’t take a bottle – how will they drink liquid if I am not around? I want to provide expressed breast milk and other milk.

Health Canada’s new guidelines recommend that babies are introduced to a cup at six months. Drinking from a cup, not a bottle, is a life-long skill we all need and is better for the teeth and palate. Even if your baby is exclusively breastfeeding, they can receive pumped breast milk with a cup. As a transition, I have helped many families who have transitioned from breast to doidy cup (a cup with a small spout) to an open-faced cup with much success. Your baby can drink breast milk or cow’s milk or alternative milk from a cup. Even if you stop breastfeeding, you can maintain your milk supply by pumping breast milk.

Do you have questions about the weaning process?

Don’t hesitate to reach out with any other questions or concerns! If you have questions about the weaning process, how to introduce solid foods, how to stop breastfeeding or how to have the most efficient nursing sessions, the Kidcrew lactation team is here to help.

Many new parents stop breastfeeding when they don’t have the support they need. if you have less breast milk than you think you should, you are exclusively breastfeeding but want to start weaning, if you want to continue breastfeeding as your child is getting older or you are going back to work, or you have questions about weaning slowly, we can help.

The general information provided on this website is for informational purposes and is not medical advice.

Do NOT use this website for medical emergencies.

If you have a medical emergency, call a physician or qualified healthcare provider, or CALL 911 immediately. Under no circumstances should you attempt self-treatment based on anything you have seen or read on this Website. Always seek the advice of your physician or other licensed and qualified health provider in your jurisdiction concerning any questions you may have regarding any information obtained from this Website and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or to someone else. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Website.

Taya Griffin

Taya Griffin | International Board Certified Lactation Consultant • Taya is a Lactation Consultant in the Toronto area. She is passionate about prenatal breastfeeding education and sees mothers at home, the hospital and in a clinic setting postpartum to help them to reach their breastfeeding goals. She also teaches pre and postnatal pilates and really can’t get enough of babies! She has two daughters, whom she wishes were still babies! Alas, they are growing up too quickly!

Taya Griffin

Taya Griffin | International Board Certified Lactation Consultant • Taya is a Lactation Consultant in the Toronto area. She is passionate about prenatal breastfeeding education and sees mothers at home, the hospital and in a clinic setting postpartum to help them to reach their breastfeeding goals. She also teaches pre and postnatal pilates and really can’t get enough of babies! She has two daughters, whom she wishes were still babies! Alas, they are growing up too quickly!

You May Also Like

The Best Positions for Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding, while a natural process, can pose challenges for new mothers. Key to a smooth breastfeeding journey is discovering the right position, ensuring both comfort and effectiveness. This guide dives into some of the most recommended positions, making the experience more enjoyable for both mother and baby.

How Long Should A Breastfeed Be?

How long should a breastfeed be? Typically breastfeeds are between 10 minutes and 40 minutes – if breastfeeds are any longer or shorter than this range, there is often a breastfeeding problem and mom is usually experiencing a number of other concerns as well.

Why Does My Nose Run?

Your nose produces up to a pint of snot per day, but you swallow most of it. While that may seem gross, it actually is very important and helps you stay healthy. Your snot keeps germs dirt and bacteria from getting into your lungs. Kind of like an air filter as you breathe.